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Category: Book of the Month

  • Watership Down – by Richard Adams

    Watership Down – by Richard Adams

    From The Sleeve Watership Down is one of the most beloved novels of our time. Sandleford Warren is in danger. Hazel’s younger brother Fiver is convinced that a great evil is about to befall the land, but no one will listen. And why would they when it is Spring and the grass is fat and […]

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  • Little Women – By Louisa May Alcott

    Little Women – By Louisa May Alcott

    From The Sleeve Generations of readers young and old, male and female, have fallen in love with the March sisters of Louisa May Alcott’s most popular and enduring novel, Little Women. Here are talented tomboy and author-to-be Jo, tragically frail Beth, beautiful Meg, and romantic, spoiled Amy, united in their devotion to each other and […]

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  • The Night Watchman

    The Night Watchman

    From The Sleeve It is 1953. Thomas Wazhushk is the night watchman at the first factory to open near the Turtle Mountain Reservation in rural North Dakota. He is also a prominent Chippewa Council member, trying to understand a new bill that is soon to be put before Congress. The US Government calls it an […]

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  • The Count Of Monte Christo – Alexandre Dumas

    The Count Of Monte Christo – Alexandre Dumas

    From The Sleeve Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantes is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use […]

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  • 100 years of Solitude – by Gabriel García Márquez

    100 years of Solitude – by Gabriel García Márquez

    From The Sleeve The brilliant, bestselling, landmark novel that tells the story of the Buendia family, and chronicles the irreconcilable conflict between the desire for solitude and the need for love—in rich, imaginative prose that has come to define an entire genre known as “magical realism.” About the Author Gabriel José de la Concordia Garcí­a […]

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  • The Graveyard Book – by Neil Gaiman

    The Graveyard Book – by Neil Gaiman

    From The Sleeve Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a perfectly normal boy. Well, he would be perfectly normal if he didn’t live in a graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor the world of the dead. There […]

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  • Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria – by

    Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria – by

    From the Sleeve Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is […]

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  • The Martian – by Andy Weir

    The Martian – by Andy Weir

    From the Sleeve Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he’s sure he’ll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with […]

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  • A Man Called Ove – by Fredrik Backman

    A Man Called Ove – by Fredrik Backman

    From the Sleeve A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door. Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict […]

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  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – by Rebecca Skloot

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – by Rebecca Skloot

    From the Sleeve Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her enslaved ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still […]

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